Public spaces are allowed to impress and awaken experiences – a new video series unveils the stories behind the West Metro’s eight stations from an artistic and architectural perspective

On Wednesday, 18 November 2020, it will be three years since the start of commuter traffic on the West Metro’s Ruoholahti–Matinkylä section and the inauguration of the eight new stations. In addition to the modern technological systems that guarantee functionality and safety, from the very beginning, the architectural planning of the new stations took into account different user groups, the location of the station and lighting. Each of the eight stations has its own unique identity, where the underground facilities engage in dialogue with the aboveground station environment and its characteristic features.

Länsimetro and Espoo’s City Events have collaboratively produced an eight-part video series, DESIGN.TUNNE.METRO., which will transport the viewer on an inspiring metro journey from Lauttasaari to Matinkylä. The journalist Riku Rantala explains in the videos how Otaniemi’s culturally significant linden alley was accounted for in the planning, how Lauttasaari’s dismantled iconic water tower is part of the metro station and why Tapiola station is a brilliant white.

The metro is an everyday mode of transport for its users and the video series encourages them to focus their gaze on the aesthetics of this backdrop to their daily lives and the small, carefully designed details. The West Metro’s stations are cultural destinations open to all city residents.

Watch the DESIGN.TUNNE.METRO. videos with your guide Riku Rantala. (videos only in Finnish)

City Events Espoo: www.espoo.fi/kaupunkitapahtumat
Presentation of metro stations: www.lansimetro.fi/en/stations/

West entrance at Matinkylä metro station to open to passengers on 1 October

The Matinkylä metro station’s west entrance will be opened to passengers on 1 October. The entrance’s address is Suomenlahdentie 9. A hotel that connects to the entrance will also be completed by the end of the year. In front of the hotel, on Tynnyritie, a new parking area for 32 bicycles will also serve metro commuters.

The Matinkylä metro station’s west entrance will be opened to passengers on 1 October. The entrance’s address is Suomenlahdentie 9.  Photo: M. Wirman.

The new entrance will connect Suomenlahdentie and Tynnyritie with the metro platform’s west end. It will provide an alternative route from the metro to the bus stops on Suomenlahdentie and buses heading in the direction of Finnoo. Matinkylä is the most-used metro station of all West Metro stations, calculated by number of commuters in 2019, and the second entrance will balance out the number of commuters on the existing route to the bus terminal and Iso Omena shopping centre. Like the West Metro’s other entrances, the new entrance on the west side is wheelchair accessible.

The new entrance will connect Suomenlahdentie with Tynnyritie at the metro platform’s west end. Photo: M. Wirman.

Architecturally, the new entrance complements the existing architecture and appearance of the Matinkylä station. The colour scheme for the new entrance differs from that of the east entrance, helping commuters tell the entrances apart. Starting from the bottom of the escalators, the backlit glass on the east-side escalators changes from yellow to green and then blue. The wall of the new west entrance is adorned with different colours of the spectrum, from red and orange to violet.

Architecturally, the new entrance complements the existing architecture and appearance of the Matinkylä station. The wall of the new west entrance is from red and orange to violet. Photo: M. Wirman.

The entrance can now be opened, since other construction in the area has moved forward. Other services being built on the so-called Tynnyripuisto block are a new indoor swimming pool and a seniors’ residence. The area will also include new residential housing as well as the ‘Life and Living’ senior centre in Matinkylä, along Suomenlahdentie. All in all, an estimated 70,000 residents will live in the metro’s catchment area in the coming decades. Correspondingly, the south entrance to Tapiola station was opened to passengers in the spring of 2019 as construction there progressed.

Länsimetro Oy’s task is to build, own, maintain and develop the West Metro system, tracks and stations from Ruoholahti westwards. In the operating section of the West Metro, Länsimetro Oy is responsible for the functioning and safety of the infrastructure and systems, and oversees that the required maintenance and repairs are taken care of as planned. HKL is responsible for repairs and maintenance as well as for the metro traffic.

“As a responsible owner, we wish to continuously develop and improve the commuter experience. We are making sure that our part is technically modern, based on digital control and maintenance, and world-class in term of safety”, says Länsimetro Oy’s CEO, Ville Saksi.          

Construction of the second phase from Matinkylä to Kivenlahti is ongoing and progressing on schedule and within budget. Work is also taking place around the architecture and look of the second phase stations.

“We want to build appealing stations that are iconic landmarks in their area. Each new station will feature a work of art that will reinforce the station’s identity”, says Saksi.

More photos

Situation management model keeps West Metro on schedule

Construction of the West Metro’s Matinkylä–Kivenlahti section is underway at all five stations and the rail section. The construction of the Sammalvuori depot has progressed to the testing phase. The schedule and costs of Finland’s largest automation, HVAC and electricity and infrastructure project are monitored in the project’s war room. The project is progressing in line with the project plan’s schedule and budget.

The nerve centre of the situation management model is the war room, which produces real-time information on the various construction areas. The project’s schedule, costs, risks, quality, smoothness of co-operation and occupational safety are monitored from the war room.

In terms of space, the construction of just one modern West Metro station is the equivalent of building a mid-sized shopping centre underground. The project involves a number of players – the developer, designers and engineers, equipment suppliers, contractors, subcontractors and authorities – who must all stick to the same schedule and pull together.

Data is supplied to the war room by contractors and West Metro’s worksite supervision. It is important not to manage the project based on information obtained from a single source; integrated situational information compiled from a number of sources helps create an overall picture of the project. The quality of the situational information has also been a focus area. The war room processes and refines recent and accurate information that is verified by several sources.

“In terms of schedule, we monitor, for example, the schedule announced by the project management contractor and the progress of the sub-contracts at each of the stations. The monitoring of the schedule is supported by cost monitoring based on several sources and West Metro’s own worksite supervision. In addition, we monitor the progress of the work through worksite visits and documentation,” says Ville Saksi, CEO of Länsimetro Oy.

Without the situation management model, monitoring such a large project and ensuring that it is kept on schedule and on budget would be a daunting task. The model was especially designed for managing a large project such as the West Metro based on the experiences gained during Phase I of Länsimetro’s project. The project is responsible for monitoring and ensuring that each contract and job is completed on time.

“Situation management means management through data, in which we are forerunners. With the help of the model, we are able to react to issues, quality problems and schedule challenges before they pose a threat to the entire project’s targets. It all comes down to proactively promoting work and addressing problems in time,” Saksi continues.

2020 will be an intense year of construction for the Matinkylä–Kivenlahti metro section. The focus of construction shifted in the spring from structural work to surfaces and interiors, HVAC and electricity and automation installations. On Länsimetro’s part, the construction will end with the simultaneous handover of all five stations and the 16.5-kilometre rail section to the metro operator in 2023.

First rails for phase II of West Metro project to be installed in summer

The superstructures contract for the rails of the Matinkylä–Kivenlahti section of the West Metro project has begun. The contract covers the laying of ballast, and the installation of cable ducts, sleepers, rails and the conductor rail. Once this work is completed, test runs of the metro train will be conducted on the new section in summer 2021. The first rails have already arrived at Matinkylä and are awaiting installation.

2020 will be an intense year of construction for the Matinkylä–Kivenlahti metro section. The focus of construction shifted in the spring from structural work to surfaces and interiors, HVAC and electricity and automation installations. All five metro stations as well as the rail line have several contracts under way and an increasing number of operators working on them. The Sammalvuori depot has already progressed to the testing phase. The depot will be completed this year. Overall, the project is proceeding in line with the project plan’s schedule and budget.

“The superstructures contract for the rail tunnels will begin with the laying of sub-ballast. The total length of the rail tunnel is 17.5 kilometres. The ballast will be brought into the tunnel in dump trucks: one load of ballast will cover approximately five metres of track. Noise insulation will be installed underneath the layer of ballast in both tunnels to ensure that structure-borne noise does not carry to the buildings above,” says Juha-Matti Pakka, supervisor of the rail engineering contracts on the West Metro project.

The next stage will see the switches installed in the tunnel; these will be measured and adjusted multiple times during the contract. Retaining wall elements, the top of which serves as an emergency exit route and the inside of which contains the technology required for a modern metro system, have already been installed in the tunnels as part of an earlier contract. The retaining wall’s cable ducts will be installed in conjunction with the levelling of the ballast.

The next step will be to install the sleepers in the tunnel. The section will have a total of 27,400 sleepers, supplied by Parma’s Forssa factory. The rails to be installed on the sleepers will arrive from Spain and will be welded into 120-metre lengths at Vossloh’s Kaipiainen factory. The rails will be delivered during the night via the Vuosaari harbour, through the current metro line to Matinkylä, and from there to the new section. The rails for the work track are already at Matinkylä, awaiting installation west of Matinkylä.

After the rails are installed, the track ballast will be laid using a ballast spreader that was specially made for the contract. Track ballast is laid in between the sleepers.

“After the track ballast is levelled out, the rail line will be supported and welded into a continuous track. Continuous track welding requires close monitoring and documentation of the rail’s temperature. This will ensure the smoothest and most consistent metro ride for future commuters,” says Pakka.

After the rail installation, a conductor rail will be affixed to the supports on every ninth sleeper. The conductor rail will be switched live in summer 2021, and thereafter test runs can begin.

The target schedule is to hand over the stations and rail line and their technical systems to the metro operator HKL in 2023. Länsimetro Oy will remain the owner and developer of the metro section.

 

Photos of phase II of the Matinkylä–Kivenlahti section of the track before the start of the superstructures contract.

The metro tunnel before the ballast, sleepers and rails: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lansimetro/47836508652/in/album-72157691717380110/

A connecting tunnel linking two parallel tunnels: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lansimetro/47836507962/

A map of the West Metro line Ruoholahti–Matinkylä and Matinkylä–Kivenlahti: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lansimetro/47675267201/

Photos of the stages of phase I of the Ruoholahti–Matinkylä superstructures contract:

Keilaniemi before the installation of the rails: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lansimetro/17054319838/in/album-72157665101958082/

Installation of the rails in phase I: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lansimetro/16568966245/in/album-72157665101958082/

The track from Ruoholahti westward, before the installation of the rails: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lansimetro/15029531393/in/album-72157648603263418

 

West Metro stations’ lighting wins in Nordic illumination competition

Länsimetro’s metro stations have been awarded for their lighting for the fourth time now. This time the stations’ lighting won the Nordisk Lyspris, i.e. the Nordic Lighting Design Awards 2020 competition.

The West Metro stations’ lighting was Finland’s first to win the Nordic Lighting Design Awards 2020 competition. The lighting in the public spaces of the eight metro stations that are part of phase I of the West Metro (i.e. Lauttasaari, Koivusaari, Keilaniemi, Aalto University, Tapiolan, Urheilupuisto, Niittykumpu and Matinkylä) was designed by VALOA design. The overall architectural integration was headed by CJN Architects, and the architecture of the stations was designed by Helin & Co, ALA Architects and Esa Piironen, APRT Architects and HKP Architects. The electrical design was executed by Tauno Nissinen Ltd. and the electrical contractor was Are. The light art for the stations was provided by Tommi Grönlund and Petteri Nisunen (Keilaniemi station), and Lighting Design Collective, Helin & Co (Lauttasaari station).

Architecture, art and design create the metro stations’ identity

The purpose of the Nordic Lighting Design Awards 2020 is to highlight the special features of Nordic lighting culture. The award is given to stand-out lighting designs that use daylight or artificial light, combining aesthetics, architecture, technology, quality and energy in an exemplary manner. Originality and creativity play a major role when projects are assessed.

“The key of the West Metro stations’ lighting solution is the integration of light and architecture as a coherent entirety. Each station has its own identity which is formed from the combination of architecture, art, and light. The role of lighting has been considered diversely, and the solution is subdued, but also architecturally high-quality and functioning in commuters’ everyday lives. The high-quality visual impact is created by the repetitive lighting styles, non-glare, sufficient light levels and the integration of the lighting,” says VALOA design’s CEO Roope Siiroinen, who was the lighting designer for the metro stations.

According to the jury, the lighting is well-integrated into the architecture. There is a great variety among different stations, and yet each station remains within the overall lighting concept. Every station is unique but the resemblance between them is clear. The lighting designers have been successful in developing and applying many different solutions. The jury also very much appreciates how light is used on vertical surfaces and behind glass. This gives the feeling of a larger space and facilitates orientation.

“It is a great honour for Finland and the complete team behind the design of the Helsinki metro stations to be awarded the Nordic Lighting Design Award. The award means a lot to us and feels like a well-deserved prize after years of hard work, co-operation, and building the field of lighting design,” says Roope Siiroinen of VALOA design.

The winners were announced on Wednesday, 20 May on the Nordic Lighting Design Awards 2020 Nordisk Lyspris Facebook live broadcast. The Nordic Lighting Design Awards 2020 were presented for the first time in 2000. The competition is organised every two years. Each Nordic country sends the winner from its own competition to the awards. Earlier this year, the West Metro stations won in the interior illumination category of the Lighting Design of 2019 competition, and as its winner, the West Metro’s lighting took part in the Nordic illumination competition. Read more about the Nordic Lighting Design Awards 2020.

In addition to the Nordisk Lyspris 2020 – Nordic Lighting Design Awards, the lighting for the West Metro stations has won three other competitions:   

  • LDA Lighting Design Awards 2019: Highly Commended
  • LIT Lighting Design Awards 2019: Winner
  • Lighting Design of 2019

Read about all of the West Metro stations.

Further information:

Roope Siiroinen, lighting designer and CEO, Valoa design, tel. +358 (0) 50 0510 904, roope.siiroinen@valoa.com

Satu Linkola, Communications Director, Länsimetro Oy, tel. +358 (0) 46 877 3392, satu.linkola@lansimetro.fi

Tapiolan metroaseman metrolaituri. Laiturialueen katosta löytyy 108 valaisinkupua, jotka toimivat akustisena vaimentimena. Laiturilla matkustajia tervehtii Emma-patsas.

Tapiola metro station

Aalto yliopisto -metroaseman alakatto on Corten-terästä.

Aalto University metro station

Keilaniemen metroaseman laituritasolla on Grönlund & Nisunen -taiteilijakaksikon valoputkista koostuva taideteos.

Keilaniemi metro station

Urheilupuisto metro station’s new eastern entrance opens on the weekend

The Urheilupuisto metro station’s eastern entrance opened to passengers on Saturday, 29 February 2020. The Urheilupuisto station was designed and built to operate with a single main entrance. Länsimetro Oy wishes to develop the passenger experience at its eight metro stations. Based on feedback, the emergency exit of the Jousenpuisto parking facility was converted into a second entrance for the Urheilupuisto station. This will facilitate passengers’ journey in the Jousenpuisto direction.

Passengers will be able to use the western entrance as usual. The new entrance is accessible, as are all of the entrances to the West Metro stations. The new entrance was assigned the identifier C on HSL’s signs.

 

The construction of the new entrance entailed structural changes required by authorities at the entrance itself and technical changes to the metro’s systems. The changes were carefully planned and implemented so that the converted entrance is practical and safe and the systems operate together with the metro’s systems. During construction, the safety requirements of the operating metro were also observed.

Read more about the Urheilupuisto metro station

 

First environmental statement for Länsimetro’s Matinkylä–Kivenlahti project completed

In an environmental statement on the Matinkylä–Kivenlahti project, Länsimetro has determined the environmental impacts of the excavation and construction of the metro tunnels and five metro stations (Finnoo, Kaitaa, Soukka, Espoonlahti, Kivenlahti), as well as the Sammalvuori depot, in 2014–2019.

To assess environmental impacts, we monitor the impacts of construction on the groundwater, ground settling, water level and soil, and we monitor water consumption and wastewater processing during construction, taking biodiversity into account and paying attention to dust and noise caused by the work sites.

The excavation contracts started up in 2014 and ended in 2018. Construction of the metro continued with construction contracts covering the stations and the rail tunnel, and these will continue until 2023.

The following is reported on in the environmental statement covering the 2014–2019 excavation and construction phase:

  • Consumption of main materials: explosives, chemicals, fuels, concrete
  • Energy consumption
  • Carbon footprint
  • Generation and utilisation of aggregates
  • Generation and processing of waste
  • Impacts on groundwater, ground settling, water level and soil
  • Water consumption and wastewater
  • Biodiversity
  • Dust
  • Noise
  • Stakeholders and dialogue, feedback, environmental requirements

As the developer, Länsimetro encourages material efficiency

Länsimetro, as the developer, can have an influence by encouraging contractors to be efficient in their use of materials. Material efficiency in construction saves natural resources and reduces waste, in turn, also mitigating the construction site’s carbon dioxide emissions. Some examples are using data modelling when designing the station and careful planning of the work phases and material purchases, which helps avoid ordering excess materials and storing them on the work site.

Construction volumes are reflected in, for instance, the number of rock-reinforcing bolts used during the excavation phase. Tunnels are reinforced at the stations using roughly six-metre-long bolts that are drilled into the rock. Based on the excavation contractors’ information, an average of 100 km of rock-reinforcing bolts were installed in the stations per excavation contract. With the average length of one bolt being six metres, the total length corresponds roughly to the distance between Helsinki’s main railway station and Hämeenlinna’s city centre.

The environmental statement also contains an assessment of the environmental impacts of blast-rock haulage. The total haulage distance for all the two-way haulages in the station and tunnel excavation contracts amounts to approximately 10,664,900 kilometres. This is the equivalent of around 267 times around the world.

72% of the carbon footprint comes from construction materials

The environmental statement also reveals that by the end of 2019, the majority (72%) of the carbon footprint of the entire Matinkylä–Kivenlahti project was made up of materials, followed by rock-blast and waste haulage (13%) and fuels (9%). By the end of 2019, roughly half of the entire project’s carbon footprint arose during the excavation phase and half during the construction phase. The total carbon dioxide emissions from excavation and construction amounted to 90,800 tCO2 by the end of 2019.

Groundwater monitored, flying squirrels taken into account

The findings of the environmental statement also indicate that the project’s construction work has had no noticeable impact on the quality of water in the groundwater pipes. In many places, the changes in the ground-settling monitoring points of buildings remained below the measurement inaccuracy. No changes deviating from the natural situation have been observed in the water level of Hannusjärvi Lake.

Near the rail line, the Finnoo area, the Kaitaa area and the Espoonlahti–Soukka area have been identified as core flying squirrel habitat areas. The core flying squirrel areas have been taken into account in the metro station planning, and flying squirrel habitats have not been endangered. The area’s metro shafts have been situated to cause as little disturbance as possible to flying squirrel habitats. The main routes of flying squirrels, i.e. treetop connections, have been retained.

Stakeholders a key part of the project

Stakeholder work has been and continues to be an important part of the Matinkylä–Kivenlahti project. The most important stakeholders from an environmental sustainability perspective are the construction area’s nearby residents, businesses and other operators, builders, policy-makers and the owner, the authorities and the personnel working on the project.

Feedback on the Matinkylä–Kivenlahti project can be given by phone or via the feedback form on the website. All feedback is addressed and responded to. Measures have been taken based on the feedback, for instance, possible damage has been investigated, the cleaning of work-site roads has been stepped up, and direction has been given to work-site operations as required based on noise complaints.

The environmental statement will be updated in 2020–2023.

Read the environmental statement (in Finnish, PDF )

Further information:

Kati Vesikallio, Environmental Manager, email kati.vesikallio(at)lansimetro.fi

West Metro stations win Lighting Design of the Year for 2019

Länsimetro’s metro stations have been awarded for their lighting for the third time now. In addition to winning the title of Lighting Design of the Year for 2019, the eight metro stations of phase II also received two other esteemed international awards – Lighting Design Awards: Highly Commended, and LIT Awards: Winner

Tapiolan asema
The Tapiola metro station is a prime example of the smooth integration of light and architecture. 

The West Metro stations won in the interior illumination category of the Lighting Design of 2019 competition.

The lighting in the public spaces of the eight metro stations that are part of phase I of the West Metro (i.e. Lauttasaari, Koivusaari, Keilaniemi, Aalto University, Urheilupuisto, Niittykumpu and Matinkylä) was designed by VALOA design. The overall architectural integration was headed by CJN Architects, and the architecture of the stations was designed by Helin & Co, ALA Architects + Esa Piironen, APRT Architects and HKP Architects. The electrical engineering was executed by Tauno Nissinen Ltd., and the electrical contractor was Are. The light art for the stations was provided by Tommi Grönlund and Petteri Nissinen (Keilaniemi station), and Lighting Design Collective and Helin & Co (Lauttasaari station).

Architecture, art and design create the metro stations’ identity

The competition assesses, among other things, the intended use of the site and lighting that supports the overall architectural solution. The aim for the lighting was to enhance commuters’ enjoyment of the spaces, and to fit in seamlessly with their surroundings.

“The key of the West Metro stations’ lighting solution is the integration of light and architecture as a coherent entirety. Each station has its own identity which is formed from the combination of architecture, art, and light. The role of lighting has been considered diversely, and the solution is subdued, but also architecturally high-quality and functioning in commuters’ everyday lives. The high-quality visual impact is created by the repetitive lighting styles, non-glare, sufficient light levels and the integration of the lighting,” says VALOA design’s CEO Roope Siiroinen, who was the lighting designer for the metro stations.

“The architectural lighting solutions used in the Helsinki metro stations are a refreshing exception to the usual metro station lighting. The high-quality environment makes passengers feel that the design not only aims for functionality, but also to increase their comfort,” said the jury on its selection of West Metro as the 2019 winner in the interior illumination category.

In granting the awards, compliance with the requirements set for modern lighting technology and the creative application of technical solutions, as well as financial and ecological factors, were also taken into account. Read more about the 2019 Lighting Design competition. (in Finnish)

The winners were announced on Wednesday, 5 February, at the Sähkö Valo Tele AV exhibition in Jyväskylä. As a competition winner, the West Metro’s lighting will take part in the Nordic Lighting Design Awards competition. The Finnish Lighting Awards competition is organised by the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) of Finland once every two years, and awards are given for both interior and exterior lighting. The competition shines a spotlight on Finnish lighting designers and developers and commendably realised lighting projects.

Read about all of the West Metro stations.

Koivusaari metro station’s platform-level floor to be re-laid – station will be closed in the summer

The Koivusaari metro station’s floor will be re-laid at the platform level in summer 2020 due to cracks in the mosaic concrete. Although the cracks do not affect the usability of the station, it was decided that the repairs should be completed as soon as possible. For that reason, the surface structures of the platform-level floor will be re-laid between 1 June and 5 August 2020.

In order to ensure that the floor can be completed over as brief a period as possible, the Koivusaari station will be closed while the work is carried out. This also means that disruptions caused by the work site will be concentrated in the summer season, when commuter volumes are the lowest.

We apologise for any inconvenience caused to commuters. The repair work will be carried out efficiently and safely such that the metro traffic passing through the station will not be disrupted, and the duration of the work will be as short as possible. The work will be carried out in three shifts. The station’s elevators and entrance lobby will be reserved for the work site personnel during the repair work. While the work is carried out, frequent metro traffic will run on both sides of the work site. The smooth flow of metro traffic was taken into account when the repair work was planned.

In 2019, the Koivusaari metro station had an average of 2,100 commuters per weekday. In July 2019, the average number of commuters was roughly 1,500 per weekday. Commuter volumes were smaller on weekends, both in summer and winter. The next metro station, Lauttasaari, had an average of 12,200 commuters per weekday, and for July that figure was 9,200.

During the floor repairs, HSL will provide additional bus transportation from the Katajaharju and Isokaari areas to the Lauttasaari metro station. Bus line 104, which travels from Lauttasaari metro station along Lauttasaarentie to Haukilahti, also serves commuters in the area. In Espoo’s Hanasaari, buses will run along Länsiväylä during rush hour periods also in the summertime. HSL will provide more information on the alternative connections during the spring on the website hsl.fi/koivusaari2020, and the information will be available in Reittiopas at a later date.

The Koivusaari metro station was completed in 2016 and opened to the public in November 2017.

Further information:

Länsimetro’s feedback telephone  (mon–fri  9 am–3 pm.): 050 377 3700

HSL (Helsinki Region Transport): traffic arrangements and commuter information: hsl.fi/koivusaari2020

West Metro being built by 38 parties – 10,000 employees

The Matinkylä-Kivenlahti section of the West Metro is being built by altogether 38 contractors and suppliers. All of the contracts were put out to tender and the construction is progressing on schedule and within budget. There are currently around 1,200 builders and so far about 10,000 employees have taken part in the mandatory worksite induction focused on worksite safety.

Due to its size, the second phase of the West Metro, i.e. the construction of five stations, a depot and 14 kilometres of rail line, has been divided up into sections suited to each contractor field.

“The construction of the metro differs significantly from other construction projects, which traditionally involve a few operators from different sectors and one main contractor. We need many major operators to carry out this project. The competitive bidding process is now completed for all of the contractors,” says Ville Saksi, CEO of Länsimetro Oy.

Six separate excavation contractors in nine different contracts excavated the rail tunnels and service tunnels, depot and stations between 2015 and 2018. Six project management contracts and 30 subcontracts are responsible for the construction of the stations and rail line. Subcontracts are functions and systems spanning the entire rail line, such as main electricity distribution, lifts and escalators, smoke extraction fans and tracks and sleepers. The Sammalvuori depot is being built by a consortium. The contract for the signal box that controls the train traffic also forms a whole. Around 20 Finnish engineering companies have participated in designing the project.

The competitive bidding for the project management contracts began in spring 2018 and was completed in autumn 2018. The value of the six project management contracts varies between EUR 43 million and EUR 58 million. Competitive bidding for 30 subcontracts was begun simultaneously with the competitive bidding for the stations and rail line. Competitive bidding for the subcontracts was completed according to the planned schedule by summer 2019, with the exception of the camera surveillance subcontract, which was carried out together with HKL. The camera supplier was selected in December 2019. The total value of the subcontracts is more than EUR 100 million.

The project management contractors have additionally carried out competitive bidding for numerous technical construction subcontractors and the stations’ building services.

“All in all, the bidding process was a success. The form of contracting we chose turned out to be a good choice. We achieved sufficient competition and received skilled operators to carry out the demanding project,” Saksi adds.

The construction of the stations and line has moved on from the concrete frame stage to the building of surfaces, building services work and system installation. In the Sammalvuori underground metro depot construction project, preparations are already being made for commissioning. The target schedule is to hand over the stations and rail line and their technical systems to the metro operator HKL during 2023.

Main contracts:

  • Finnoo station construction contract: LM Finnoo consortium (GRK Infra Oy and Aki Hyrkkönen Oy)
  • Kaitaa station construction contract: YIT-ARE consortium
  • Soukka station construction contract: YIT-ARE consortium
  • Espoonlahti station construction contract: SRV Rakennus Oy
  • Kivenlahti station construction contract: Skanska Infra Oy
  • Rail line construction contract: GRK Infra Oy
  • Sammalvuori depot construction contract: Sammalvuori consortium (Kalliorakennus-Yhtiöt Oy, EM Pekkinen Oy, Terrawise Oy and Aro-Systems Oy)

All of the subcontractors and operators responsible for designing the West Metro can be found on the West Metro website.